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The E-Sylum:  Volume 9, Number 33, August 13, 2006, Article 10

BEP EMPLOYEE CHARGED WITH STEALING UNCUT $100 SHEETS

Remember those funny $100 bills that turned up in Delaware
earlier this summer?  Here's our previous E-Sylum article:

$100 BILL ERRORS FOUND IN DELAWARE - AUTHENTICITY DISPUTED
esylum_v09n24a12.html

Well, "Feds said Monday they've solved at least part of the
mystery of the so-called "Delaware Hundreds."

"A Dover coin dealer, who bought three from customers who got
them at Harrington Raceway's Midway Slots, asked federal officials
to investigate whether they were printing errors worth thousands
or merely stolen goods filched at a mint.

A mint worker was arrested Friday and more arrests are possible,
the Office of the Inspector General said today. Details were not
immediately available."

To read the complete article, see: Full Story

"An employee at the Bureau of Engraving and Printing appeared in
federal court Monday on charges he stole ten sheets of $100 bills.

David Faison, of Largo, waived a preliminary hearing and was
released from jail on his own recognizance. A date hasn't been
set for his next court appearance."

"According to court documents, Faison distributed paper stock at
the bureau's printing facility and had access to the area where
$100 bills are printed.

Most of the sheets he is accused of stealing contained 32 uncut,
partially printed bills. The money appeared normal, but it was
missing serial numbers and Treasury seals."

To read the complete story, see: Full Story

To see a local D.C. news video: Full Story

On Tuesday August 8th the Associated Press picked up the story:
"For a two-month period beginning in late May, 145 partially printed
bills passed through the Midway Slots, Dover Downs Slots and Delaware
Park casinos in Delaware; Bally's and Trump Plaza in Atlantic City,
N.J.; and the Charles Town Races and Slots in Charles Town, W.Va.
The bills appeared to have been cut with scissors.

In July, surveillance videos show Faison sitting at slot machines,
and records show that the stolen bills were inserted into the
machines during those times, according to the affidavit. At one
point, three of the $100 bills were inserted within 19 seconds.

A search of Faison's home Thursday resulted in the recovery of
some of the stolen bills, which were hidden in wrapping paper in
Faison's bedroom closet, the affidavit said."

To read the complete article, see: Full Story

On Wednesday the Washington Post had a more in-depth article:

"Peter Bradley, the general manager of slot operations at Dover Downs,
said the casino received a tip from the Treasury Department that
Faison might show up at the casino.

"They gave us a description, and one day one of our surveillance
folks picked him up," Bradley said.

The casino made certain that the surveillance videotape of Faison was
enough of a close-up to show that one of the $100 bills that Faison
inserted into a slot machine did not have serial numbers or the
Treasury seal, officials said. Dover Downs security later verified
that Faison gambled with $400 that day and that all of the bills
were partially printed."

To read the complete article, see: Full Story

[So Raymond Gesualdo, owner of First State Coin Co. in Dover was
right - he didn't want anything to do with the bills, believing
them to be stolen.  Has anyone gotten a look at these notes?  No
doubt many have already been confiscated by the Secret Service,
but there are certainly still some out there in circulation or
being held by people who think they have a valuable error.

I wonder how long it will take to round them all up?  And what
will become of them - will they all be destroyed?  Will some be
held in the Secret Service files?  Will any find their way to the
National Numismatic Collection?

A theft of any kind from the BEP is a very rare and historic event,
and it would be good to see a piece of the evidence preserved at
the Smithsonian.  But regulations probably prohibit a counterfeit
being anywhere, even in the NNC - I've never heard of counterfeits
being part of the collection.  -Editor]

  Wayne Homren, Editor

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