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V14 2011 INDEX       E-SYLUM ARCHIVE

The E-Sylum: Volume 14, Number 35, August 21, 2011, Article 10

TREASURY DOCUMENTS LIST DEADBEATS OF THE PAST

One of the blogs I enjoy reading is Past Is Present from the American Antiquarian Society. Here's an item relating to today's headlines. -Editor

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Since last October, the project catalogers creating online rare-book level records for 1801-1820 imprints have been working on United States' federal documents. Admittedly, some government documents are boring. But much more often than I imagined they have been a source of interesting, even surprising, information.

Many documents, but especially Secretary of the Treasury Albert Gallatin's report to the House of Representatives, dated November 6th, 1807, remind us that the questions the country is grappling with today are the same as occupied Congress and government officials two hundred years ago:

On the first day of January, 1809, the principal of the debt, will, if the proposed modification be not assented to by the public creditors, amount to near fifty-seven millions and five hundred thousand dollars That the revenue of the United States will be considerably impaired by a war, neither can or ought to be concealed. It is, on the contrary, necessary to examine the resources which should be selected, for supplying the deficiency, and defraying the extraordinary expenses. Whether taxes should be raised to a greater amount, or loans be altogether relied on for defraying the expenses of a war, is the next subject of consideration.

Depending on one's point of view, knowing this can be oddly reassuring (we've gotten through this before, we can do it again), or the cause for sadness (why don't we learn from history?)

But the documents which have most recently piqued my interest and imagination are three statements from the Comptroller of the Treasury, dated 1814, 1815, and 1817. They report "unsettled balances" remaining on the books of the Treasury Dept. In the 1814 statement, John Chisholm, "conductor of Indians," is listed with a balance of $926.24. The accompanying note reads, "He is not to be found." Was he killed by Indians, did he die of illness or accident en route, or did he take the money and run? In the 1815 statement, Robert Alexander, contractor for building a custom house at New Orleans, is listed with an outstanding balance of $19,000. The note reads, "Custom House built, no account rendered." Lost in the mail? And in the1817 statement, Samuel Sitgreaves, "commissioner under 6th article British treaty," is listed with a balance of $6,857. 20. The note reads, "Advanced by Department of State. No account rendered. Mr. S. alleges that the public is in his debt." Call me a cynic, but what are the odds that this was ever settled?

To read the complete article, see: John Adams: Deadbeat, careless accountant, or the continuing victim of partisan politics? (pastispresent.org/2011/good-sources/john-adams-deadbeat
-careless-accountant-or-the-continuing-victim-of-partisan-politics/)

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Wayne Homren, Editor

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