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The E-Sylum: Volume 14, Number 43, October 16, 2011, Article 14

MORE ON ENGRAVER PHILIP RANDALL

Regarding the 1872 Boston International Peace Jubilee Medal, Kay Olson Freeman writes:

The medal's maker is Philip Green Randall who is not a "Jno" or "Junior". His father's name was Charles Randall.

There is no one in his ancestry with his name and, if there was, Randall would be styled "II"; not "Jr".

The medal is marked "P.G. Randall & Co" which was used in Boston City Business Directories listing of die sinkers and letter cutters, 82 Sudbury St. - a later address than 41 Arch St.

Philip G. Randall was born March 16, 1851, Mattapoisett, MA and died Dec. 28, 1925, Malden, MA, He is always listed as an engraver or die sinker in census. His father, Charles Randall (1822-1893) was a caulker in ship building.

[There is another Philip Green Randall (1876-1902) in Massachusetts who is not related, never worked, and spent much of his short life in California and Arizona due to ill health]

The Randall marked International Peace Jubilee medal clearly says at bottom "Pat. June 18, 1868." I did not find a patent for it. There is a Design patent #5937, June 18, 1872, for a Peace Jubilee Medal in shape of Maltese Cross granted to George Frederick Crook of Cambridge, MA. This design is totally different than Randall's. Crook did not make medals; he was a printer/publisher.

Philip G. Randall's advertisement says he is successor to William N. Weeden (born 1841, New Bedford, MA - died 1891, New Bedford, MA). Weeden left his letter cutting business in Boston in 1870's to live in Waterbury, CT and work for Benedict & Burnham Manufacturing Co. Weeden was foreman/supt. of very important factory which involved brass and watch and clock making.

Weeden has @ 24 patents for a variety of uses. When Weeden was in Boston, July 10, 1866, a seal or embossing press was patented by him and John Merriam, who was a die sinker. Weeden returned from Waterbury to New Bedford in 1883.

Thanks for the great information! -Editor

Ron Abler writes:

The two medals that Dick Johnson cites as Holland 4 and 5 are Randallís Antiques and Horribles (A&H) medal and his Joseph Warren (JW) medal. I have attached images of both, including blow-ups of Randallís signature from each. I agree with Dick. In both cases, the Randall that did these two medals signed his name as RANDALL SC. In addition, both of these Centennial medals are more amateurishly executed than the International Peace Jubilee shell.

A&H 01 Obverse A&H 02 Reverse

A&H 01 Signature

A&H 02 Obverse A&H 02 Reverse

A&H 02 Signature

JW Obverse JW Reverse

JW Signature

Thanks for the close-up signature photos. This has been an interesting topic and proof once again that E-Sylum readers have an incredible wealth of numismatic knowledge, and are quite willing to share it. My readers continue to amaze me. -Editor

To read the earlier E-Sylum article, see: 1872 INTERNATIONAL PEACE JUBILEE MEDAL ENGRAVER: PHILIP RANDALL (www.coinbooks.org/esylum_v14n42a06.html)

Wayne Homren, Editor

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