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V15 2012 INDEX       E-SYLUM ARCHIVE

The E-Sylum: Volume 15, Number 23, June 3, 2012, Article 13

THE NEW-YORK HISTORICAL SOCIETY: RESPECT THE HYPHEN!

Dick Johnson submitted the following comments on the spelling of the name of the New-York Historical Society. Thank-you! -Editor

NYHS logo Alan Weinberg gave an excellent report on his visit to a museum in New York City in the last E-Sylum. Trouble is, he got the name of the museum wrong. There is a hyphen in the name New-York Historical Society.

Apparently the organization hotly defends the use of that hyphen in the name. Here is a quote from Louise Mirrer, President and CEO of the Society, who gives a history of that hyphen.

Why did New-York Historical Society decide to keep the hyphen in its name?

The placement of a hyphen between "New" and York" was common usage during our founding in 1804. Even as this custom began to abate in the decades that followed, hyphens were routinely maintained on title pages of books and mastheads of newspapers into the 1840s, while The New York Times held on to its hyphen until 1896. The organization used and has retained the hyphenated version of the city's name that was common at the time. In vigilantly fighting for its hyphen, The New-York Historical Society highlights the continuity of its role in the cultural and educational life of the city.

To read the complete article, see: Q&A with Louise Mirrer, President and CEO of New-York Historical Society (www.thirteen.org/treasures-of-ny/qa-with-louise-mirrer-president-and-ceo-of-new-york-historical-society/)

I wrote about this previously, asking if a person who does not use the hyphen in the proper position is consider a country bumpkin or uneducated.

Here is what I wrote on the American Art-Union Series [the proper name for this series also employs the hyphen] for the web site of Medal Collectors of American. Medal Series.

There is no rule that if you omit the hyphen between Art and Union you would be considered a country bumpkin, uneducated. But like the name New-York Historical Society - including the hyphen was the spelling custom of the day - which continues to present. If you include it, you are hip, with it. (But if your computer search comes up empty with the hyphen, try it without.) Unquote.

Get Hip, Alan. Include the Hyphen. Now you're with it!

To read the complete article, see: American Art-Union Medal Series (www.medalcollectors.org/Guides/AAU/AAU.html)

I knew better, and can prove it by the hyphen I used in "For More Information on the New-York Historical Society, see..." I was just too lazy to insert the hyphen everywhere else. Since Alan's a Califonia bumpkin, I thought I'd just let it pass. I figured no one would notice, but secretly hoped someone would. Thanks, Dick! So how could all you New-Yorkers let a Connecticut bumpkin beat you to it? -Editor

To read the earlier E-Sylum article, see: A NUMISMATIC VISIT TO THE NEW YORK HISTORICAL SOCIETY (www.coinbooks.org/esylum_v15n22a23.html)

Wayne Homren, Editor

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The Numismatic Bibliomania Society is a non-profit organization promoting numismatic literature. See our web site at coinbooks.org.

To submit items for publication in The E-Sylum, write to the Editor at this address: whomren@gmail.com

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