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The E-Sylum: Volume 18, Number 7, February 15, 2015, Article 10

NOTES FROM E-SYLUM READERS: FEBRUARY 15, 2015

Determining the Highest Value Banknote
Last week David Pickup asked:

I was wondering what the highest value currency unit is. I do not mean the largest denomination e.g. Million Dinars but the value of the unit itself. I looked online and cannot see anything. I think the lowest value is the Iranian currency. Any ideas?

Pete Smith writes: 100 Million Pound Note

England issued a L100,000,000 banknote. A problem with determining the highest value banknote is that often the high value notes were never actually used in commerce.

To read the earlier E-Sylum articles, see:
NOTES FROM E-SYLUM READERS: FEBRUARY 8, 2015 : What is the Highest Value Currency Unit? (www.coinbooks.org/esylum_v18n06a08.html)
BRITAIN'S 1M AND 100M POUND BANKNOTES (www.coinbooks.org/esylum_v16n04a22.html)

How Long To Fold and Unfold a Dollar Bill?
Ron Abler writes:

Regarding the item on the man who paid his taxes in folder dollar bills, how does one fold 600 dollar bills that require six minutes each to unfold? I’m thinking that folding normally takes longer than unfolding, and I have never seen an origami-ed dollar bill so complex that I couldn’t unfold it in a lot less than six minutes.

Good question. The authorities may have been "rounding up" or plain exaggerating the time required; on the other hand, a really tightly folded note might take some time to reverse. It would have been helpful to see a picture of one of the folded notes. -Editor

To read the earlier E-Sylum article, see:
TEXAS MAN PAYS TAXES IN FOLDED DOLLAR BILLS (www.coinbooks.org/esylum_v18n06a20.html)

A Virtuous Woman's Epitaph
David Powell writes:

I thought that readers might enjoy the following snippet, which appeared in several English provincial newspapers on 30 or 31 December 1808:

"A stonemason at Colchester was lately employed by a tradesman there to engrave the following epitaph on his wife:—“A virtuous woman is a crown to her husband.”—The stone, however, being narrow, he contracted the sentence in the following manner: "A virtuous woman is 5s to her husband.”—The tradesman refuses payment for the stone, the engraver sustains his charge, and the matter stands for the Quarter Sessions to determine."

Heritage Newman Sale VI 2015-02-08


Wayne Homren, Editor

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