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V23 2020 INDEX       E-SYLUM ARCHIVE

The E-Sylum: Volume 23, Number 1, January 5, 2020, Article 12

NOTES FROM E-SYLUM READERS: JANUARY 5, 2020

Washington's Dollar Sign Located

Regarding the 1792 George Washington bond illustrated last week, I asked, "... where exactly is the dollar sign the caption refers to? The bond is hard to read because writing on the back is bleeding through. " -Editor

79015133

Don Cleveland writes:

Washington's dollar sign is at the lower left of the document, just above the III of M.XXVIII.

1792 George Washington bond circled dollar sign

Bill Eckberg also spotted the dollar sign, and helpfully circled it. Martin Purdy of New Zealand also located it. Thanks, everyone. -Editor

1792 George Washington bond circled dollar sign

To read the earlier E-Sylum article, see:
BBC ON THE ORIGINS OF THE DOLLAR SIGN (https://www.coinbooks.org/v22/esylum_v22n52a27.html)

Careful With That Stapler!
Alan Weinberg writes:

"Relative to stapling or removing coins from stapled 2x2s: I am reminded of the story of how legendary collector Harry Bass once put a staple into a Proof-only 1863 gold quarter eagle."

Ouch! -Editor

To read the earlier E-Sylum article, see:
UNINTENTIONAL WAYS COLLECTORS DAMAGE COINS (https://www.coinbooks.org/v22/esylum_v22n52a12.html)

Saint Wulfric
Regarding the British Museum's newly-acquired Wulfric seal, Jim Duncan of New Zealand writes:

"There are numerous entries in Wikipedia for a Wulfric who became a saint. So I guess the seal is not his only mark. An heraldic whiz might be able to locate his arms...!"

To read the earlier E-Sylum article, see:
BRITISH MUSEUM ACQUIRES 1,000-YEAR-OLD SEAL (https://www.coinbooks.org/v22/esylum_v22n52a26.html)

The Deep Detail of Linotypy
Joseph Alan Barnosky writes:

Three cheers for Harvey Stack's use of the term "leadering".

So much time have I into the brain-racking of gregarious insecurity. Often enough the clue to turning off an unintended tangent is found in the homophony of something, either English or foreign, but of what?

Can't stop remembering your Canadian friend who really pronounced the "T" as "T" that time? Since when am I interested on the deep detail of linotypy?

Ah. The homophony of what!

To read the earlier E-Sylum article, see:
NOTES FROM E-SYLUM READERS: DECEMBER 29, 2019 : Harvey Stack on Printing Technology (https://www.coinbooks.org/v22/esylum_v22n52a06.html)

E-Sylum Leidman ad02new portrait


Wayne Homren, Editor

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The Numismatic Bibliomania Society is a non-profit organization promoting numismatic literature. See our web site at coinbooks.org.

To submit items for publication in The E-Sylum, write to the Editor at this address: whomren@gmail.com

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