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The E-Sylum:  Volume 9, Number 30, July 23, 2006, Article 19

PERTH MINT PRODUCES COMMEMORATIVE INCORPORATING MOVING IMAGES

The Perth Mint of Western Australia announced an interesting
commemorative coin incorporating moving images:

"A square coin styled on an early television set, complete with
moving images, has been released by The Perth Mint as a tribute
to 50 years of Australian television.

Struck from 1oz of 99.9 per cent pure silver in proof quality
and issued as Australian legal tender, the 50 Years of Australian
Television 1956-2006 coin features "lenticular'' imaging effects
to portray six television icons from the past 50 years of
broadcasting.

The Perth Mint is the only mint in the world to issue legal tender
coins displaying 'moving' lenticular images. Two previous lenticular
issues, the 35th Anniversary of the First Moon Walk and the 60th
Anniversary of the End of World War II 1945-2005, became collector's
items."

"As the coin is moved, the images 'morph' miraculously from one
to another in a sequence portraying some of the most memorable
personalities and productions in Australian television history."

To read the complete article, see: Full Story

[Have any of our readers seen these coins?  Is the Perth Mint truly
the first to produce coins using lenticular images? (We've seen
earlier mentions of banknotes with such a feature).  The process
has been around for decades.  At least one token and medal manufacturer
uses them (scroll down to item #6: Full Story )

Here's a tutorial I found on the subject of lenticular images:

"When looking at a lenticular image, as your angle or view changes
you see first one image and then another. If you use enough images,
you can actually create a short video-like sequence.

Lenticular images have come a long way since their early days. It's
now possible to carry a short 1-second "video" in your pocket, or
hang it on the wall. As you turn a lenticular image in your hand, or
walk by a large one on the counter or wall, the image seems to come
to life. Depending on how the underlying photographs were taken,
lenticular images can convey the illusion of 3D and/or video motion."

lenticular.htm
-Editor]

  Wayne Homren, Editor

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