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The E-Sylum:  Volume 9, Number 35, August 27, 2006, Article 16

MORE ON THE NATHAN M. KAUFMAN COLLECTION

In last week's item on Harry Boosel, I asked about the Nathan M.
Kaufman collection.  Here's what Boosel's Coin World obituary said
about it:

"He is also remembered for another major contribution to numismatics.
He ``uncovered'' the long-forgotten collection of Nathan M. Kaufman,
labeled the ``find of the century,'' in 1976. Mr. Boosel had first
encountered the collection in 1943 when assigned by the U.S. Army to
Marquette, Mich. The collection was on display in a Marquette bank,
in a special room built specifically for the coins. However, he did
not then have access to two safes containing some of the rarest coins.

More than 30 years later, Mr. Boosel returned to Marquette and was
reintroduced to the collection, which had long been forgotten by most
in the hobby. He was granted access to the two safes and uncovered
one of the most important collections built during the 19th century."

Len Augsberger writes: "The Kaufman sale was by RARCOA on 8/4/1978.
The coins are said to have been mounted on display with tacks; most
of the pieces in the collection thus lost their provenance and rim
marks quickly.  No doubt many are today entombed in plastic.

There is more discussion on the PCGS chat board (rapidly becoming
an indispensible research tool) at: Full Story

[The collectors.com post notes: "Louis G Kaufman ... and his brother
Nathan built one of the finest privately held coin collections in history.
It was housed in the bank in Marquette mostly ignored by the numismatic
fraternity. It contained great rarities such as 1 of 2 1825/4 $5 gold
and Kellogg $50 gold. Large runs of Proof gold and silver coins were
also there.

Unfortunately most were attached to the display boards by 3 small brass
tacks which left rim marks on most of the coins. The collection was
sold by Rarcoa in 1978 for record prices. Most of the pedigrees were
quickly lost as most of the rim marks rapidly dissapeared."  -Editor]

  Wayne Homren, Editor

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