PREV ARTICLE       NEXT ARTICLE       FULL ISSUE       PREV FULL ISSUE      

V9 2006 INDEX       E-SYLUM ARCHIVE




The E-Sylum:  Volume 9, Number 44, October 29, 2006, Article 4

MINT ENGRAVERS AMONG WILLIAM LOUTH'S RECORDED REMINISCENCES

Dick Johnson writes: "I had a two-day appointment with William T.
Louth, my old boss, who had retired as president of Medallic Art
Company shortly after the 1976 American Bicentennial and its
tremendous outpouring of medals. I had not seen Bill since three
years ago when Donald Scarinci asked me to accompany him to
interview Bill for data for the Society of Medalists book he is
writing.

I had asked Mark Sartori, president of my local coin club, to join
me this time as a driving companion on the long trip to Cape Cod
for some numismatic chitchat along the way. Mark sat in on one of
the recording sessions with Bill.

Well into the first hour Bill mentioned he remembered John Flanagan,
sculptor and coin designer. I saw Markís jaw drop. I could almost
read his mind - "Here is someone still alive who knew John Flanagan
in person!" I prompted Bill to tell us everything he remembered
about Flanagan, then mentioned something about other coin designers.

"I remember Adolph Weinman," he said, picking up on our numismatic
interest. He went on: "and the Frasers, Laura and James."

"How about Anthony DeFrancisci?" I asked.  "Tony!" he corrected me.
"I remember Tony." He filled us in on the personality of each of these.
I tossed out John R. Sinnockís name. "Sure." "Didnít he do your
portrait?" I said, remembering Sinnock had done the portrait of
Billís uncle, the longtime president of Medallic Art, and the firmís
entire board of directors.

"No, that was Gilroy who did my portrait." Then I remembered that
occurred after Sinnock had died. But I marveled at the first-name
basis he used with all these artists -- he had been that familiar
with them (and probably they were with him!).

Here we were, chatting about 20th century coin engravers, all long
gone. Every one of these sculptors had done private medals which
were produced by Medallic Art Ė in addition to the work they had
done for the U.S. Mint. Bill had not only known them, but worked
with them, and often socialized and even visited their studios
many times.

Despite fading memories, we "squeezed the orange" to use Don
Scarinciís term, gleaning as many recollections as we could from
an old-time friend.

It was tough to say goodbye to Bill, now in his 80th year and in
declining health. But I was glad, however, for the opportunity to
have had these conversations and get them on tape."

  Wayne Homren, Editor

Google
 
coinbooks.org Web
The Numismatic Bibliomania Society is a non-profit organization 
promoting numismatic literature. See our web site at coinbooks.org.

To submit items for publication in The E-Sylum, write to the Editor 
at this address: whomren@coinlibrary.com

To subscribe go to: https://my.binhost.com/lists/listinfo/esylum
Copyright © 2005 The Numismatic Bibliomania Society.

PREV ARTICLE       NEXT ARTICLE       FULL ISSUE       PREV FULL ISSUE      

V9 2006 INDEX       E-SYLUM ARCHIVE


Copyright © 1998 - 2005 The Numismatic Bibliomania Society (NBS)
All Rights Reserved.

NBS Home Page
Contact the NBS webmaster