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The E-Sylum:  Volume 10, Number 15, April 15, 2007, Article 21

WALDO NEWCOMER'S COIN CABINET

George Fuld writes: "The discussion about coin cabinets in the
April 8th E-Sylum brings to mind a cabinet that my father and I
acquired about 1970.

"When George Williams died in the early 70’s, we found out some
history about him.  His major interest was collecting Maryland
tokens — a subject in which we were most interested.   Tom Warfield,
of Mason-Dixon Coin Co., acquired from his estate the collection of
Maryland tokens and a wonderful pure mahogany coin cabinet.

"Williams worked for about twenty years for Waldo Newcomer as his
special assistant for his numismatic interests.  Williams did all
the mundane things involved with building a first rate collection
for Newcomer.  (Of interest is that Louis Eliasberg, Sr. also had
a full time numismatic assistant, a lady whose name I cannot recall.
She also did all the mundane things required to build a fine
collection for her boss).  When Newcomer committed suicide in 1933,
in his will, Newcomer gave only one thing to Williams, his mahogany
coin cabinet.

"This cabinet housed Newcomer’s U.S. gold collection.  It stands on
its own legs with three tiers of about 15 trays, all made of mahogany.
Each tray (or drawer) had small wooden dowels to make divided space
for each coin.  There is also a large drawer above with two large
trays with dividers that would hold larger coins — those greater than
about 40mm.  The cabinet was housed in my father’s coin room until
his death in 1987.  We had our Maryland token collection housed in it.

"The cabinet (about 3 ˝ feet wide, 15 inches deep and standing about
5 feet high) stayed at my mother’s apartment until she moved to Santa
Barbara in 1990.  I considered selling the cabinet (a local coin
dealer, Milton Lynn had been trying to buy it for years and even
asked about it at the Baltimore show last week.)

"When my son Robert heard that we wanted to sell it, he had an
inspiration.  “I will keep the cabinet in our living room as a
major addition to our furnishings.”  The cabinet has sat in my
son’s living room since 1990 — completely empty.  My son has no
interest whatsoever in coins or anything to do with them!  Thus,
Waldo Newcomer’s coin cabinet remains in our family — empty but
not forgotten."

  Wayne Homren, Editor

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