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The E-Sylum:  Volume 10, Number 29, July 22, 2007, Article 19

AGRICULTURE LEADER NORMAN BORLAUG TO RECEIVE CONGRESSIONAL GOLD MEDAL

The student newspaper of Texas A&M noted this week that "Norman
Borlaug, distinguished professor of international agriculture,
Nobel Peace Prize winner and father of the Green Revolution will
receive the Congressional Gold Medal Tuesday for his work to
counter famine.

"The Department of Soil and Crop Sciences said Borlaug is
responsible for saving more lives than any person who has ever
lived. His most notable achievement is the development of a
high-yielding, disease-resistant wheat. The wheat helped counter
starvation in Mexico, India, China and Pakistan.

"The Congressional Gold Medal is the highest expression of
national appreciation for distinguished achievements and contributions.
All Congressional Gold Medal legislation must be cosponsored by at
least two-thirds of the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives
before it is submitted to the respective committee.

"The medal is created on an individual basis by the United States
Mint to reflect the recipient and their contributions. Previous
recipients include George Washington, Thomas Edison, Mother Teresa
and Rosa Parks."

To read the complete announcement, see:
Full Story

The newspaper published a longer profile on Borlaug last week:
"Through the National Youth Administration, a depression-era
program designed to provide work-study jobs to college students,
Borlaug enrolled at the University of Minnesota, where he studied
forestry. It was in Minneapolis that he was exposed to the hunger
he would combat his entire life.

"When I got to Minnesota, to my horror, I saw hundreds of people
go downtown to Minneapolis - people with their hands up - young,
middle-aged people asking for a nickel to buy bread. That's
how things were."

"Borlaug's most well-known work started in Mexico and came in
the form of a genetically modified, semi-dwarf wheat plant.
Working with local Mexican and American scientists and farmers,
he was able to create, culture and spread a shorter and stouter
wheat plant that was stronger, resisted disease and yielded
more. It quickly turned around Mexico's status as a wheat producer.

"But Borlaug wasn't done. While experts were predicting famine
in the 60s for India and Pakistan, he was working to bring the
same success to the warring nations. It wasn't safe work, and
the Indian-Pakistan war sometimes crept close to where he was
planting.

"It's not hard for Borlaug to keep himself motivated, though,
as he can state his central passion in clear terms.

"'I hate suffering and human misery,' Borlaug said."

To read the complete article, see:
Full Story

  Wayne Homren, Editor

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