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V13 2010 INDEX       E-SYLUM ARCHIVE

The E-Sylum: Volume 13, Number 7, February 14, 2010, Article 21

DESIGNING THE 2010 WINTER OLYMPIC MEDALS

Dick Hanscom forwarded a link to this interesting and inspiring BBC video about the designing of the 2010 Winter Olympic and Paralympic medals. -Editor

2010 Olympic medals

2010 Olympic medal designer Corrine Hunt The medals for the 2010 Winter Olympics have been designed by an Aboriginal Canadian called Corrine Hunt. She spoke to the BBC about the inspiration behind her designs.




To read the complete article, see: Making the Olympic medals (news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/programmes/world_news_america/8511899.stm)

Dick Johnson forwarded this related story from Scientific American. -Editor

When Olympic champions are crowned at this year's winter games in Vancouver, these elite athletes will be taking home more than just gold, silver or bronze medals—they will be playing a role in Canada's efforts to reduce electronic waste. That's because each medal was made with a tiny bit of the more than 140,000 tons of e-waste that otherwise would have been sent to Canadian landfills.

The more than 1,000 medals to be awarded at the Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games, which kick off today, amount to 2.05 kilograms of gold, 1,950 kilograms of silver (Olympic gold medals are about 92.5 per cent silver, plated with six grams of gold) and 903 kilograms of copper. A little more than 1.5 percent of each gold medal was made with metals harvested from cathode ray tube glass, computer parts, circuit boards and other trashed tech. Each copper medal contains just over one percent e-waste, while the silver medals contain only small traces of recycled electronics.

This is the first time that recycled materials have been added to Olympic medals, which historically have been made from mined mineral deposits refined for commercial use. Each Olympic medal is 100 millimeters in diameter, about six millimeters thick and weighs between 500 and 576 grams, depending upon the medal.

To read the complete article, see: (www.scientificamerican.com/blog/post.cfm?
id=winter-olympic-medals-made-from-rec-2010-02-12)

Wayne Homren, Editor

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