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V13 2010 INDEX       E-SYLUM ARCHIVE

The E-Sylum: Volume 13, Number 46, November 14, 2010, Article 8

MORE ON THE NORTH CAROLINA COLONIAL CURRENCY HOARD

Regarding the stunning Cornell hoard of North Carolina colonial currency recently acquired by The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, I wrote to Erik Goldstein, the Foundation's Curator of Mechanical Arts and Numismatics. I wondered if individual images of some of the notes were available, or if an exhibit catalog was in the works. His reply is below. -Editor

Colonial Williamsburg North Carolina currency hoard Erik Goldstein writes:

Since we are treating the hoard as a single object, we aren’t photographing the notes individually – but they are fairly representative of the 1748-1771 notes, and by in large, are heavily circulated, with the exception of the 1771 issue.

Sorry, no plans for a catalogue for the new coin exhibit.

Erik does have a good bit of information on the hoard, although nothing is formally written up yet. He offered to answer any specific questions E-Sylum readers might have. If there's anything you would like to know, pass your questions along. I'd be curious to know how the hoard managed to stay intact for so many years, and how the rest of it entered numismatic channels. Who was the dealer who bought it? Have all of the other notes been dispersed? -Editor

Mark Borckardt writes:

I read about the Cornell Currency Hoard in the last issue of The E-Sylum with a personal interest. Samuel Cornell’s activities in relation to the Battle of Alamance were discussed briefly. The Battle was described as “a small taxation rebellion.” However, it was much more than that.

Governor Tryon had been unfairly taxing the western North Carolina colonists for years, with no representation. That followed similar policies in western New Jersey long before. Many of the colonists had relocated to North Carolina from Western New Jersey in the early 1700s, and formed a community known as Jersey Settlement. Tryon enforced his taxation policy through unscrupulous sheriffs who yielded a heavy hand, and the local colonists formed a group known as the Regulators.

Following the Battle of Alamance, Tryon had six individuals hung for treason against the British crown. Among the six was Captain Benjamin Merrill, who was my sixth great grandfather.

To read the earlier E-Sylum article, see: COLONIAL WILLIAMSBURG ACQUIRES NORTH CAROLINA COLONIAL CURRENCY HOARD (www.coinbooks.org/esylum_v13n45a07.html)

THE BOOK BAZARRE

DAVID SKLOW - FINE NUMISMATIC BOOKS offers the Q. David Bowers Research Library Sale Part IV on February 12, 2011, including: Second edition 1883 Andrews 1816-1857 United States Large Cents . www.finenumismaticbooks.com. PH: (719) 302-5686, FAX: (719) 302-4933. EMAIL: numismaticbooks@aol.com. USPS: Box 6321, Colorado Springs, CO. 80934. Contact me for your numismatic literature needs!


Wayne Homren, Editor

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