The Numismatic Bibliomania Society

PREV ARTICLE       NEXT ARTICLE       FULL ISSUE       PREV FULL ISSUE      

V23 2020 INDEX       E-SYLUM ARCHIVE

The E-Sylum: Volume 23, Number 25, June 21, 2020, Article 14

NOTES FROM E-SYLUM READERS: JUNE 21, 2020

On the "United States Mint" Silver Dollar Collection

United States Mint Silver Dollar Collection coins

Julian Leidman writes:

"I agree that the US mint silver dollar set was something that was done privately and had nothing to do with the US Mint."

Thanks. -Editor

To read the earlier E-Sylum article, see:
NOTES FROM E-SYLUM READERS: JUNE 14, 2020 : Query: United States Mint Silver Dollar Collection (https://www.coinbooks.org/v23/esylum_v23n24a13.html)

The Case of the Pickled Planchet
Regarding Dick Hanscom's question about brightening a dark annealed planchet, Erik Goldstein writes:

"I'd offer: Pickle it, in an acid solution."

Thanks - worth a try! -Editor

To read the earlier E-Sylum article, see:
NOTES FROM E-SYLUM READERS: JUNE 14, 2020 : Query: Brightening an Annealed Bronze or Brass Planchet (https://www.coinbooks.org/v23/esylum_v23n24a13.html)

More on Coin Orientation

four 1796 $10 Eagle reverses after orientation

Dave Lange writes:

"I found Ron Guth's commentary on the correct orientation of coin photos to be very interesting. I load many of the photos that NGC's Imaging Department takes for Coin Explorer and VarietyPlus, and one coin type that is almost always delivered with an incorrect rotation is the common reverse design of Coronet Liberty quarter eagles through eagles. It seems that everyone wants the eagle to stand up straight, with the shield upright as well, but examination of the coin reveals that this was not the artist's intent. The legend stops flanking the denomination are clearly meant to align on a single horizontal plane, and doing this turns the eagle clockwise in the die, or counterclockwise to a viewer of the coin. The denomination and legends are thus balanced, while the eagle is leaning to one side.

"I'm attaching a couple of examples taken from Coin Explorer to illustrate this point."

Coronet Liberty eagle Wrong orientation Coronet Liberty Right orientation
Wrong and Right eagle orientations

Thank you. Great observations. It pays to heed the artist's intent. I like the second orientation much better. -Editor

To read the earlier E-Sylum article, see:
RON GUTH ON COIN ORIENTATION (https://www.coinbooks.org/v23/esylum_v23n24a33.html)

Cleaning vs. Conservation
1794 Franklin Press Token reverse Before conservation With a subject line putting coin "conservation" in quotes, Martin Purdy of New Zealand writes:

"I'm quite horrified by this. Is the fact these coins and tokens have been "restored" included on the certifier's label so buyers know their history? I thought the certification companies rejected cleaned coins outright - and even if it's done delicately and professionally, cleaning is still cleaning."

Conservation efforts are an important part of the history of a numismatic item, closely related to its provenance. Auction and dealer price listings should include these when known. If one is proud of one's work, one shouldn't be shy about it, and thanks to NCS for publishing these before-and-after images. Owners of the conserved pieces should reference this documentation when selling. While some buyers may be against cleaning or conservation on principal, others may prefer it. I know I'd be scared to death to try this on my own, but might wish for professional assistance in cases where it's warranted. -Editor

To read earlier E-Sylum articles, see:
ON NUMISMATIC DOCTORING AND CONSERVATION (https://www.coinbooks.org/v22/esylum_v22n22a11.html)
MORE ON NUMISMATIC DOCTORING AND CONSERVATION (https://www.coinbooks.org/v22/esylum_v22n23a14.html)
1794 FRANKLIN PRESS TOKEN CONSERVATION (https://www.coinbooks.org/v23/esylum_v23n24a34.html)

Copper Coin Colors and the Golden Biscuit
Bill Eckberg writes:

1821 Large Cent obverse Golden Biscuit color "Unfortunately, the coin illustrated in the E-Sylum articles about the Golden Biscuit would not qualify as such. If that was the coin, it has darkened a lot.

"This coin was illustrated in the Grading Guide For Early American Copper Coins as a Golden Biscuit. It was included in a two-page spread illustrating 34 coins (plus a large nugget of native copper) in various natural colors from Red to Ebony. Those who think copper coins come only in Red, Red-Brown and Brown are missing out on a lot of beauty, variety and interest."

It's a beauty! Thanks, -Editor

To read the earlier E-Sylum articles, see:
LOOSE CHANGE: JUNE 7, 2020 : The Golden Biscuit (https://www.coinbooks.org/v23/esylum_v23n23a41.html)
NEWMAN PORTAL: MORE ON THE GOLDEN BISCUIT (https://www.coinbooks.org/v23/esylum_v23n24a08.html)

Query: Chuck's Coin Corner
Kevin Day-Thorburn of Saint John, NB Canada writes:

"I always enjoy your E-Sylum. I came across the attached holder recently and am wondering if any readers can identify the dealer, Chuck's Coin Corner. This sort of numismatic history, the people behind the hobby, I find interesting."

Chuck's Coin Corner holder back Chuck's Coin Corner holder front

Can anyone help? I wouldn't be surprised if there were more than one "Chuck's Coin Corner" around. -Editor

More on C. E. Horn
Bill Groom writes:

C. E. Horns Counterstamp obverse "The C.E. HORN counterstamp is an intriguing piece in that there's so much info conveyed. I suspect it's a one-of-a-kind item; this, given the individual letter punches used to create it. It was a labor of love, in effect, and perhaps Horn's personal pocket piece and calling card. Might the year of the coin have been Horn's birth year? Perhaps, the stamped coin was a jocular gift to him? Beyond speculation, I did manage to find a few facts.

Clarence E. Horn appears in Polk's 1879 Albany City Directory as a grocer at 101 Green (per the below attachment). The grocery store was his "milk depot." He was absent from directories, dated 1875 and earlier.

"The house pictured didn't look to have been built in 1830. A Zillow listing reports it was built in 1930"

Horn, Clarence E,  1879 Polk's Albany Dir.

I'd have to agree on the house - the architecture does look more 20th century to me. -Editor

To read the earlier E-Sylum article, see:
MORE ON THE C. E. HORNS COUNTERSTAMP (https://www.coinbooks.org/v23/esylum_v23n24a17.html)

Holabird E-Sylum ad 2020-06-14


Wayne Homren, Editor

Google
 
NBS (coinbooks.org) Web

The Numismatic Bibliomania Society is a non-profit organization promoting numismatic literature. See our web site at coinbooks.org.

To submit items for publication in The E-Sylum, write to the Editor at this address: whomren@gmail.com

To subscribe go to: https://my.binhost.com/lists/listinfo/esylum

PREV ARTICLE       NEXT ARTICLE       FULL ISSUE       PREV FULL ISSUE      

V23 2020 INDEX       E-SYLUM ARCHIVE

Copyright © 1998 - 2012 The Numismatic Bibliomania Society (NBS)
All Rights Reserved.

NBS Home Page
Contact the NBS webmaster
coin